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The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted several consultations and sensitisation sessions with various categories of stakeholders on the Impending Ban on Single-Use Plastics proposed for 2021. Consultations were conducted with members of the public and businesses in Lethem, Mabaruma as well as, Georgetown. The Agency also held focus group meetings with local manufacturers and importers, supermarket representatives and non-governmental organisations (NGOs). The Agency also convened a multi-stakeholders task force comprising of representation from fifteen (15) organisations, inclusive of the Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA) and the Private Sector Commission (PSC). The objectives of these sessions are to raise awareness on the ban and collect empirical data on how the ban will affect various categories of stakeholders.  

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Preparing for the Impending Ban on Single-Use Plastics- Part 2

 

A life without plastics seems impossible, since plastics are the main component in almost every single everyday item; from our computers and mobile phones, to food containers and other packaging.

Single-use plastics, however, generally have a functional life of less than a week, and are not designed to be repaired or refurbished. Single-use plastics include packaging, bags, bottles, straws, containers, cups, cutlery, and other items. Bio-plastics are not exempt from the single-use plastic designation as in general; bio-degradation only occurs under specific circumstances e.g. certain temperatures, and the presence of micro-organisms.

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Preparing for the Impending Ban on Single-Use Plastics- Part 1

 It seems as though a new gruesome image or video of a marine animal suffocated by plastics gets uploaded to social media every day. By now, you have probably heard the stories of marine animals being washed up on shore with their stomachs full of plastics. These stories and images are graphic, but often, we may catch ourselves thinking: if plastics are so bad, then why do we continue to use and produce them? Plastics are easy to use and transport materials. It is impossible to imagine life without them; just take a look around you. However, plastics actually have far-reaching, negative effects on the environment prompting the international community to rethink how we use and dispose of these materials, especially single-use plastics. As Guyana continues to transform itself into a Green State, the country has announced that by 2021, there will be a ban on single-use plastics. Within the next few weeks, the Environmental Protection Agency will write a series of articles on single-use plastics with the intention of keeping the public up to date as we move towards phasing out these materials.

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Preparing for the Impending Ban on Single-Use Plastics- Part 3

 

Guyana has over the years, been implementing laws (Regulations) to tackle the solid waste scourge, including the Litter Regulations 2013 and the Expanded Polystyrene Regulations 2015. The latest in the efforts is the impending ban on single-use plastic products which is expected to come into force in 2021. In our previous articles, we spoke about the ban itself and offered alternatives that you can start to consider as we transition to a life with much less plastic. For many of us, environmental issues only get our attention when they have a direct impact on our health or immediate surroundings, so you might ask yourself, why should I care about a ban on single use plastics?

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