EPA’s Response to Misconceptions in the Media regarding the Modified Liza 1 Environmental Permit

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The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) wishes to address several misconceptions and inaccuracies being pedalled by persons, particularly select political, legal and technical pundits, regarding the EPA’s modification of the Environmental Permit for the Liza 1 Development Project, Offshore Guyana.

First and foremost, the EPA takes this opportunity to clarify that the modification was pursued in strict accordance with the legislation due to the intermittent periods of flaring conducted by Esso Exploration and Production Guyana Limited (EEPGL) due to technical issues offshore Guyana. Prior to its modification, the Permit prohibited ‘Routine Flaring’; however, process upsets, equipment failures and maintenance events are not considered ‘Routine Flaring’ in the Oil and Gas Industry. Such events were not specifically addressed or regulated in any way by the original Permit.

Further, the original permit only required EEPGL to notify the EPA for flaring sustaining a volume of at least 10 MMCFD and lasting at least five (5) days. However, the modified Permit now includes specific timelines for detailed instances of flaring, and notification and approval processes, during which the company must justify its reason(s) for flaring and the EPA reserves the right to reject this request if unjustified.

The timelines prescribed by the Modified Permit are consistent with the US Code for Federal Regulations which establishes that flaring may not exceed 48 hours without seeking approval. Further, international benchmarking shows that the initial start-up period averages approximately 90 days, however, the modified permit specifies a more conservative start-up period of 60 days, below the average international benchmark. This is also consistent with the recently issued Payara Environmental Permit.

Any flaring in excess of these timelines requires the company to pay for the emission of Carbon Dioxide equivalent (CO2e) at the rate of US$30 per tonne of CO2e. To this end, the EPA was guided by the Polluter Pays Principle, which was prescribed by the Environmental Protection Act in 1996, but has served as a universal principle of environmental management even prior to this, and has continuously developed in its interpretation and applicability as a result of national and international jurisprudence, customary law, and international environmental laws and conventions.

Consequently, the EPA utilised carbon pricing benchmarking to determine this payment, so that the monies acquired from the pollution events could be used for Supplemental Environmental Projects (SEPs). Moreover, the determination of US$30 per tonne of CO2e was a result of rigorous research and is consistent with introductory prices for CO2e implemented by developed countries such as Canada.

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PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT

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The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) wishes to remind the general public, their right to the enjoyment of music is not their right to disturb others. As our children are engaged in virtual classes and many people continue to work from home, the Agency urges all to be considerate and avoid excessive noise emissions.

Frequent exposure to noise can have serious implications for human health and animals which include but are not limited to the following:

  1. Annoyance and poor level of concentration;
  2. Increased heart rate leading to elevated blood pressure;
  3. Sleep deprivation;
  4. Headaches and migraines;
  5. Psychological triggers for people with Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety;
  6. Hearing loss; and
  7. Inability to hear and escape from danger.
  8. Animals use sound to navigate, find food, attract mates, and avoid predators. Noise pollution makes it difficult for them to accomplish these tasks, which affects their ability to survive.

Be the Solution, Stop Noise Pollution!

 

 

 

PUBLIC NOTICE

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February 24th, 2021-The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hereby informs the general public that excessive emission of noise is an offence under the Environmental Protection (Noise Management) Regulations (2000). Defaulters can be fined up to $700,000 and face up to one year imprisonment.

As our children engage in virtual classes and many of people continue to work from home, the Agency advises citizens to desist from emitting noise level above the prescribed decibel limits.

Categories

Day(dB)

Night(dB)

Residential

75

60

Commercial

80

65

Industrial

100

80

Frequent exposure to noise can have serious implications for human health and animals which include but are not limited to:

  • Annoyance and poor level of concentration;
  • Increased heart rate leading to elevated blood pressure;
  • Sleep deprivation;
  • Headaches and migraines; and
  • Hearing loss.

Contact your local authority and report all matters of noise pollution. Be vigilant and exercise caution as we celebrate. Remember your right to music is not your right to disturb others.

EPA conducts Community Consultation at Wellington Park Mangrove Reserve, Region 6, as part of the GEF CLME+ EBM Project

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The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) met with ten (10) representatives, comprising of members from three communities surrounding the Wellington Park Mangrove Reserve site, Regional Democratic Council representatives (Region 6) and NAREI’s Mangrove Ranger on November 11, 2020. The consultation took place the boardroom of the EPA Whim Regional Office and sought to continue discussions on plans to restore the Wellington Park Mangrove Reserve.

All COVID 19 protocols were observed by participants and organisers.

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