EPA takes noise management training to Region 2

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The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) collaborated with the Guyana Police Force, to train forty –four (44) Police Officers in noise management. Given the COVID-19 health restrictions, the training was conducted in two (2) batches on March 23 and 24, 2021, respectively. Officers were drawn from along the Pomeroon-Supenaam area including Suddie, Anna Region, Charity, Leguan, and Aurora police stations. This training brings the total number of Police Officers trained to date to two hundred four (204).  

 This first phase of the training aimed to build the capacity of Police Officers to better understand and manage noise emissions in the region. Officers were exposed to topics such as EPA’s role in noise management, understanding noise and its impacts, regulatory responsibility of the EPA and the Guyana Police Force in noise management, and evidence-based enforcement of the Noise Regulations. The second phase of the training,  featured the practical application of the training which included the use of the noise meter to collect evidence.

Based on the recommendations of the participants, it is imperative that a strategy be outlined and agreed between the relevant parties so that this joint initiative can be materialised and be sustained. As such, the legal representatives from both organisations are working towards developing a mechanism for this collaboration.

Managing leak detection in gas stations

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A typical Veeder Root System

What  you need to know about leak detection mechanisms at Gas Stations

Leak detection mechanisms are widely used in the petroleum sector, primarily in gas stations. There are several types used in Guyana, such as an electric shut-off system, dipstick, overflow alarm, sensors on the tank walls, gauging system, and a 'Veeder Root System'.

Moreover, gas station operators over the past years have been primarily using the dipstick and the electronic shut-off system as part of their leak detection mechanisms. However, in recent times, several operators were found to be using the 'Veeder Root System' which is a more advanced system in detecting leakage in the tanks, fuel level, and any water in the tank.

Why are leak detection mechanisms important in gas stations?

Leak detection mechanisms are used to determine if a leak has occurred in the system, tanks, or pipeline. Given that the majority of tanks are located underground, it would be difficult to ascertain whether or not there is a leakage, thus, the above-mentioned mechanisms can be used to safeguard both the underground and above ground tanks. Further, it should be noted that a single pint of fuel released into the waterways, either above ground or below ground can contaminate approximately one (1) acre of water. So it’s our responsibility to protect human health and the environment by encouraging operators to implement these systems at their gas stations.

Valuing Water

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World Water Day is observed on 22 March every year since 1993, focusing on the importance of freshwater. World Water Day celebrates water and raises awareness of the 2.2 billion people living around the world without access to safe water. It is about taking action to tackle the global water crisis. A core focus of World Water Day is to support the achievement of Sustainable Development Goal 6: Water and sanitation for all by 2030.

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Oil and Gas compliance inspection of the Liza Destiny

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In the month of March, the Oil and Gas Unit conducted a full scale compliance inspection of the Liza Destiny Floating, Production, Storage and Offloading Unit (FPSO), the production platform attached to the Liza Phase 1 Development Project in the Stabroek Block. The team also inspected one of the drillships (Noble Tom Madden - pictured below, photo courtesy of oilnow.gy) which undertakes both exploratory and developmental drilling.

This trip was a significant milestone since the EPA was able to audit the Liza Phase 1 Development Project against conditions of the Environmental Permit granted by the Agency. From the compliance inspection, the team was able to appreciate the conditions under which oil production is undertaken and also have a first-hand look at the complexities of such projects.

Despite the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Oil and Gas Unit continues to work to ensure that all efforts are made to continue with its compliance monitoring programme with the aim of ensuring that operators within the oil and gas industry fulfill their environmental obligations.